This topic contains 42 replies, has 36 voices, and was last updated by  Firenailer 10 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #58656

    moondog
    Participant

    How many out there know someone or heard of someone who gave up riding for one reason or another?

    #60708

    CTYankee
    Participant

    I’ve seen posts on other forums where some folks kick around the idea of giving it up. In particular, it was advancing age (approaching the 70 mark) and concerns about declining reactions and reflexes, along with the physical stress of riding longer distances.

    There also, from time to time, is the post about one close call too many…and on the for sale sign goes…

    #60711

    moondog
    Participant

    Not advancing age though sometimes it feels like it ๐Ÿ™‚ . I went down on my R100 last year and broke my right leg. I am kind of spooked now. I expecting that deer to jump out of me or some one pull out in front of me. I am taking it slow this year. I can’t fathom the idea of giving it up. I need to get my nerve back.

    #60718

    Beemer-me-up
    Participant

    [QUOTE=moondog ยป]Not advancing age though sometimes it feels like it ๐Ÿ™‚ . I went down on my R100 last year and broke my right leg. I am kind of spooked now. I expecting that deer to jump out of me or some one pull out in front of me. I am taking it slow this year. I can’t fathom the idea of giving it up. I need to get my nerve back.[/QUOTE]

    Sorry to here about your accident. Not to be callous, But you have heard the
    old addage, that if you fall off a horse it best totet right back on… I have
    been in two accidents in 30+ years of riding. One was my fault and one was caused by a drunk driver. We have a hoppy that can be dangerous, but so is skiing, diving, jumping from planes, etc.. all have thier risk, but we do as best we can to minimize the danger and have fun. It’s good that I sometimes still get scared. It keeps me on my toes. My biggest fear right now is teenage girls on cell phones. Keep the rubber side down. Just my 2 cents. ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    PS saw you thread on the MOA also, but I’m tryin to use this site more.

    #60720

    moondog
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Beemer-me-up ยป]Sorry to here about your accident. Not to be callous, But you have heard the
    old addage, that if you fall off a horse it best totet right back on… I have
    been in two accidents in 30+ years of riding. One was my fault and one was caused by a drunk driver. We have a hoppy that can be dangerous, but so is skiing, diving, jumping from planes, etc.. all have thier risk, but we do as best we can to minimize the danger and have fun. It’s good that I sometimes still get scared. It keeps me on my toes. My biggest fear right now is teenage girls on cell phones. Keep the rubber side down. Just my 2 cents. ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    PS saw you thread on the MOA also, but I’m tryin to use this site more.[/QUOTE]

    Not callous at all..And I did get back on. Much to the displeasure of a brother who says I should stay off at least a year and take the advance riding class. I not sure the class is right for this moment. I am shakey and need to get my nerve back but I understand what he is after. This was my first accident and I am also revaluating the bike. It is a K1100 and very top heavy.

    And i hear ya on teenagers and phones. Same thing with my ex- and her to girls. One racked up over $800 in one month, $600 the next month and then nothing the next because we took it away from her. she also racked up $500 in parking tickets too. You’re not alone.

    #60724

    dpryan
    Participant

    I didn’t exactly give it up, I just took a short break (for 25 years!) ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Got back on in ’04, and I try not to kick myself too much for ever having stopped.

    Like a lot of folks, I had other things going on back then and was being transferred around with work, etc. At some point, I sold my bike and it became something I “used to do”. I hear that sentiment a lot from folks around work who see me coming & going in my gear: “yeah, I used to have a bike, man! was that fun…. but then I gave it up because of [COLOR=”Red”][/COLOR] and I’ve always regretted it”.

    Then there are those that say, “man, I’d love to get a bike but I know I’d kill myself on one!”…. I always wonder about that one… :rolleyes:

    #60727

    AntonLargiader
    Participant

    When I hear someone say they’re giving up riding, I don’t try to change their mind. It’s what they want, and I just assume they rather not ride than ride, when it comes down to it. They might still like the idea of riding, but making that decision means that not riding is truly their preference, so I just let it go. I’m usually not even sad for them, except maybe in the cases where they can’t afford to ride or something like that. Kids, wife, whatever… it’s that person’s choice.

    #60770

    Dutch
    Participant

    Hey all; Forced out of riding for only a couple of years. (Ex-wife took my whole collection with her and left me the kids!) It wasn’t so bad… NOT!! I’ve thought about giving it up more times then I care to think about. The closest I’ve ever came was after my S/O and I hit a eight point buck on the way to work one night. The left me laid up for a fair piece. Stop riding? Not very likely!! Ride more carefully, Oh yeah. Vaya con Dios, Dutch

    #60869

    AndrewE
    Participant

    My first and only bike was a ’73 R75/5. Sold it about 10 years ago to pay the rent for a couple months, didn’t replace it. As time goes on, I feel it’s more of a luxury for me now, choosing to spend my time in other ways. As my kids get older and don’t rely on me for entertainment or transportation, I will likely buy another one. But for now, I’m content to sneak a ride on my brothers’ 800.

    #60877

    CT-RT
    Participant

    I came back last year after about 22 yrs. From talking to people it’s not an unusual one.
    Once during those 22 yrs my wife said she wouldn’t have married me if I had kept the bike. Now she tells me.
    Glad to be back though.
    Got my son into it though I wish he had done it younger.
    Most people I hear who are leaving are for age.
    Saw a lot of limpers at the Finger Lakes Rally.

    #60878

    CTYankee
    Participant

    I had an very interesting conversation at a Labor day event. I met a nice guy in his 70s who had just recently given up riding. He spent hundreds of thousands of miles riding all over the united states over the past 50 years. In the most recent 20 or so, he was a self described Honda-guy. He struck up a conversation with me when he saw my red bmw ra t-shirt.

    He was t-boned by a car in the spring. And his bike was totaled.

    When I asked if he was going to get back on another Honda, his response was that recovery took longer than he thought it should have and during a follow up with his doctor, he was advised that due to his age, future accidents would take as long and longer to heal. “Reflexes and bones aren’t what they used to be” he said. So, after some careful consideration and the advice from his doctor, he decided to (in his words) “Hang up the leather for good. ”

    He is a super nice guy, he had a terrific perspective. I hope when the days comes where I give it up, I’m as okay with it as he seemed to be.

    #60890

    MPGOLIGHTLY
    Participant

    In my younger days, I rode a 1979 Honda XL-100, had no idea what I was doing, but, I learned as I went along. There was not any rider training in those days.

    I crashed and burned 4 different times in those days and always somehow got back up. But, at the age of 19 I seemed to bounce pretty well.

    lesson #1 I learned that when the rear brake is locked up, ride it out, the first time high sided me into a barb wire fence, good thing about leather flight jackets, their tough.

    lesson#2 Make sure the intersection is clear and traffic approaching from the left can go first even if you have the right away.

    lesson #3 when riding side xside, make sure your partner won’t turn into you.

    lesson #4 street knobbies will slide out from under you even at low speeds at the university rounding a turn.

    close calls, every day. have to ride through todays traffic like tip-toeing through a mine field. Best thing I ever done was take the MSF safety class.

    I don’t know what I would do if I could not ride, it’s an addiction.
    A couple of years ago I had a doctors appointment, he must have been standing in the window when I came in, first thing he said “Motorcycles are not Doctor approved” . But, then again what is?:D

    Ride safe, ride often

    #61053

    Switz
    Participant

    I was in a group of 8 bikes in April going on a dinner ride. Due to a lapse in attention, bike #8 smashed into/ or high sided the rider into bike #7. Rider #8 had the passenger peg of bike #7 enter into and shatter the right leg into tiny pieces just below the knee joint and broke the right wrist in several places and fractured a steel plated left wrist. Rider #7 received road rash and a broken small left leg bone. His totaled bike went into bike #6 whose bike has never been the same after the rebuild and the rider was thrown onto the pavement splitting his palms from the impact. That took all of a few seconds in my rear view mirror as bike #3.

    Rider #8 retired from riding when he regained conscious thought and he and his wife sold their three motorcycles. He still has a cain to walk with and will be lucky to get back to 90% of his starting point of mobility.

    I started riding in 1969 on a R69S, and after several off road experiences on it and a R75/5 and R90S, and I quit in 1975. I tried again in 1990 and a had a major speed and sandy road related incident on a Harley FLHS. I started again in 2000 on a Harley Fatboy after a beginner’s course. The stable has expanded and contracted several times since then and the signature below reflects the current population of bikes located in three states.

    I think each person’s tolerance for risk changes over time. It did for me in my flying career where there were no accidents in over 2,500 flying hours over 25 years as a commercial, instrument , multi-engine rated pilot. When the day comes I am baffled by the bike, the whole lot plus gear goes on sale. No confidence for me means no riding.

    Just my $0.02.

    #61063

    bmwrider79
    Participant

    QUOTE
    Best thing I ever done was take the MSF safety class.

    ANY newer rider or returning rider who doesnt do a MSF class is a fool.

    QUOTE
    A couple of years ago I had a doctors appointment, he must have been standing in the window when I came in, first thing he said “Motorcycles are not Doctor approved” .

    Whe my dad was layed up from a nasty car accident ( actually in ICU 5 week coma plus 6 months or rehab) we would visit on the bike.

    Nurses and other staff would say oh there dangerious etc… I would reply ATGATT and ask them when they took a safe driving course besides drivers ed in high school? Then I ask them how many safe driving books they have read? Then the tough question do they ever do any thing else besides drive behind the wheel? or do they pull over & do it what ever it is?

    I thought trikes were kind of silly but then the parts guy at my dealer suggested they were options for those that still wanted to ride but could no longer hold up a 500 to 800 pound bike. Different point of view.

    I trust I will have the right frame of mind when I have to hang it up.

    I agree with Anton never talk some one into riding. If the mind is not into it could be real bad decision.

    #61066

    MPGOLIGHTLY
    Participant

    [QUOTE][/QUOTE]I agree with Anton never talk some one into riding. If the mind is not into it could be real bad decision.

    My 2 cents is that I never talk anyone into riding. If they have never ridden, I won’t entertain the thought about discussing riding. Too many times I get people asking about riding, nice people, but, they haven’t a clue as to what it takes. Usually they are people my age over 40. If they really persist I tell them take an MSF course first for $25 and see if that is truly what they want to do.
    I know that this may poo-pa our treasured love of riding and seems selfish, but, I think its the prudent thing to do. I have seen a few new riders crash and burn and then condem the person that talked them into it.
    I know this very nice lady who is about 57, just had to learn to ride. She took the MSF class and then bought a Honda Rebel. She now rides in shorts and flip-flops and can’t wait for the one year novice to expire so she can ride without a skid-lid. Does she have the skills to ride safely and be proficent? I don’t think so. She has even asked if she could go riding with our little group, how do you politely tell someone you can’t, because your skills and machine won’t keep pace with the BMWs even on a very leisure ride. And not that we (our group) rides like the very young sport groups, agressive. But, we as BMW riders know far too well that our machines are more capable than the riders and the riders of BMWs are very capable themselves.

    Every day that I ride is another opportunity for myself to improve from the day before. I know that I need all the practice I can get. Someday I plan on getting down to BMW at Spartanburg to take their class and then find myself at a track for track day school. I believe in training. The more the better. I have a lot to learn yet.
    I had a friend who rode all his life, then he got invited to CHPs school for 2 weeks. He came back saying he learned more at CHPs about riding than he had ever learned before. Of course CHPs isn’t available to the public. But, I think it would be good to learn what they know at a school that is.
    I guess I am from old school thinking, Riding is not for everyone.

    I hope this does’nt sound too selfish or mean.

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