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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 43 total)
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  • #62227
    dancogan
    Spectator

    I almost gave up riding. Nearing age 65 and following a couple of surgeries that indicated my days of heavy lifting are over, I talked to may wife about selling the bikes. The 1200RT was too hard to balance with even a light weight passenger on board, and became scary at off camber or hilly stop signs. But instead of giving up my wife insisted we try a Spyder. Rode it to the RA Rally this year. It takes some getting used. There’s no substitute for twisties on 2 wheels. But you’re still out in the fresh air, you smell the fresh cut hay, you feel the temps go down as you go up, and you get wet when it rains. We’re loving it. And I still have an F650GS for when I’m riding alone. David Hough, who rides a Spyder now, started a thread about his Spyder experiences over on the MOA forum and that’s what got me thinking about it. Thank you Mr. Hough!

    #61723
    egnblack
    Spectator

    I have been riding for 40+ years. Motorcycling is something that has gotten into my blood. Motorcycling is a part of me. It is my freedom. When I get on my bike, all of my worries and problems go away. I plan to ride as long as the good Lord allows me.

    #63261
    scooterboy
    Spectator

    My neighbor four doors down quit riding after he had his left leg amputated below the knee because of an accident he had 15 miles from home three years ago. He was in the hospital for seven months because the doctors didn’t want him to lose his leg. After three skin grafts and four blood infections he lost it anyway. When he came home he weighed 105 lbs. Now he has a prosthetic leg and is doing much better. He is 83 years old.

    #63263
    DOGGETT MARK
    Spectator

    I guess you quit riding when you’re uncomfortable for whatever reason you deem fit, to get back on the bike. It’s all personal. No judgments. We had a minor accident a few years ago. I still tense up on exit ramps in the rain. But I still love riding.

    #58656
    moondog
    Spectator

    How many out there know someone or heard of someone who gave up riding for one reason or another?

    #60708
    CTYankee
    Spectator

    I’ve seen posts on other forums where some folks kick around the idea of giving it up. In particular, it was advancing age (approaching the 70 mark) and concerns about declining reactions and reflexes, along with the physical stress of riding longer distances.

    There also, from time to time, is the post about one close call too many…and on the for sale sign goes…

    #60711
    moondog
    Spectator

    Not advancing age though sometimes it feels like it πŸ™‚ . I went down on my R100 last year and broke my right leg. I am kind of spooked now. I expecting that deer to jump out of me or some one pull out in front of me. I am taking it slow this year. I can’t fathom the idea of giving it up. I need to get my nerve back.

    #60718
    Roy Jackson
    Spectator

    [QUOTE=moondog Β»]Not advancing age though sometimes it feels like it πŸ™‚ . I went down on my R100 last year and broke my right leg. I am kind of spooked now. I expecting that deer to jump out of me or some one pull out in front of me. I am taking it slow this year. I can’t fathom the idea of giving it up. I need to get my nerve back.[/QUOTE]

    Sorry to here about your accident. Not to be callous, But you have heard the
    old addage, that if you fall off a horse it best totet right back on… I have
    been in two accidents in 30+ years of riding. One was my fault and one was caused by a drunk driver. We have a hoppy that can be dangerous, but so is skiing, diving, jumping from planes, etc.. all have thier risk, but we do as best we can to minimize the danger and have fun. It’s good that I sometimes still get scared. It keeps me on my toes. My biggest fear right now is teenage girls on cell phones. Keep the rubber side down. Just my 2 cents. 😎
    PS saw you thread on the MOA also, but I’m tryin to use this site more.

    #61998
    Nonskid
    Spectator

    I’ve thought of giving it up but I just can’t do it yet. My goal is to be riding my own bike when I’m 60 years old. Getting close. After that I don’t know. When it’s good it’s REAL GOOD!

    #60720
    moondog
    Spectator

    [QUOTE=Beemer-me-up Β»]Sorry to here about your accident. Not to be callous, But you have heard the
    old addage, that if you fall off a horse it best totet right back on… I have
    been in two accidents in 30+ years of riding. One was my fault and one was caused by a drunk driver. We have a hoppy that can be dangerous, but so is skiing, diving, jumping from planes, etc.. all have thier risk, but we do as best we can to minimize the danger and have fun. It’s good that I sometimes still get scared. It keeps me on my toes. My biggest fear right now is teenage girls on cell phones. Keep the rubber side down. Just my 2 cents. 😎
    PS saw you thread on the MOA also, but I’m tryin to use this site more.[/QUOTE]

    Not callous at all..And I did get back on. Much to the displeasure of a brother who says I should stay off at least a year and take the advance riding class. I not sure the class is right for this moment. I am shakey and need to get my nerve back but I understand what he is after. This was my first accident and I am also revaluating the bike. It is a K1100 and very top heavy.

    And i hear ya on teenagers and phones. Same thing with my ex- and her to girls. One racked up over $800 in one month, $600 the next month and then nothing the next because we took it away from her. she also racked up $500 in parking tickets too. You’re not alone.

    #60724
    dpryan
    Spectator

    I didn’t exactly give it up, I just took a short break (for 25 years!) πŸ˜‰
    Got back on in ’04, and I try not to kick myself too much for ever having stopped.

    Like a lot of folks, I had other things going on back then and was being transferred around with work, etc. At some point, I sold my bike and it became something I “used to do”. I hear that sentiment a lot from folks around work who see me coming & going in my gear: “yeah, I used to have a bike, man! was that fun…. but then I gave it up because of [COLOR=”Red”][/COLOR] and I’ve always regretted it”.

    Then there are those that say, “man, I’d love to get a bike but I know I’d kill myself on one!”…. I always wonder about that one… :rolleyes:

    #60727
    ANTON LARGIADER
    Spectator

    When I hear someone say they’re giving up riding, I don’t try to change their mind. It’s what they want, and I just assume they rather not ride than ride, when it comes down to it. They might still like the idea of riding, but making that decision means that not riding is truly their preference, so I just let it go. I’m usually not even sad for them, except maybe in the cases where they can’t afford to ride or something like that. Kids, wife, whatever… it’s that person’s choice.

    #61495
    macfly
    Spectator

    I rode everyday from 15 to 36, I didn’t get a car of my own till I was in my thirties, but I gave up riding when I lost three friends one summer, all to accidents caused by the other people.

    In the interim I missed bikes a lot, it was a hard cold turkey. The magazines on the news stands would call out to me like a pusher to a junkie, it was a hard cold turkey!

    To try to get over it I spent most of the last fifteen years going round in circles on four wheels at every track day I could find. Still didn’t do it for me, and with the recession coming I sold all the track stuff. That was when I first saw the HP2 Megamoto. I knew it was time to come home.

    It is amazing just how wonderful it is riding, after fifteen years of trying every kind of four wheeled fun I can honestly say that no matter how good they are, cars, even track cars, just aren’t as involving and magical as riding a bike.

    #61279
    kpinvt
    Spectator

    [QUOTE=moondog Β»]Not callous at all..And I did get back on. Much to the displeasure of a brother who says I should stay off at least a year and take the advance riding class. I not sure the class is right for this moment. I am shakey and need to get my nerve back but I understand what he is after. This was my first accident and I am also revaluating the bike. It is a K1100 and very top heavy…

    [/QUOTE]

    Talk to someone. Four, almost five years ago I dropped my first bike in front of an oncoming car at an intersection. I lay on the ground on my left side with the bike on top of me watching the cars left front wheel rolling towards my head. The car was moving slowly, at least I remember it as slowly, I just managed to pull myself up to the right and lift my left arm up high enough to push away from the wheel and slide my helmeted head along the fender. The car stopped and I pulled myself upright using the drivers door handle. This incident completely unnerved me. I cold barely ride the bike the two blocks home without crashing into curbs. Afterwords I could not bring myself to ride the bike. My condition progressively worsened, at first I would suit up and sit on the bike only to put the side stand down and go back into the house. I would suit up and stand by the living room window and stare at the bike before taking the suit off and going for a ride in the car. I started making up reasons not to ride like the battery was flat. Of course it was flat I left the lights on all day when my wife was at work. I eventually traded my beautiful red 2000 Suzuki SV650 to a contractor for 15 vinyl windows and a new steel back door. After a while of still feeling terrible for having given up I sought professional help. I found a psychologist who used behavior modification techniques that after six months started working. I had almost completely blocked out the details of the incident. Talking to her allowed me to really think I could ride again. I bought an ancient 1985 Kawasaki 454LTD as my reentry bike. With the help of one her colleagues, who was riding a BMW R100 at the time, (which probably explains my affinity for BMW’s and belt drives) we used exposure therapy by riding around and around a few blocks near my house. The big breakthrough came about a month later after not being able to take a longer ride with the BMW owning therapist due to scheduling conflicts. My wife had left her work keys and pager home and asked me to bring them to her at work. I could have taken my car but the bike was sitting in the driveway and without really thinking about it I suited up and got on the bike and headed out of town with my heart in my throat. I was hyperventilating the whole way. I remember having a terrible time seeing the speedometer and having to bend my head down at a sharp angle to see the instruments. About half a mile from her job I realized what was wrong and pulled over. I had my helmet on wrong. I had the helmet rolled backwards so far the chin bar up so high it was blocking my vision. I started riding everyday after that until I crashed four months later and wound up buying a scooter, a Honda Silver Wing, because the accident had injured my left ankle making it almost impossible to shift. Phew! Jeezum Crowbars! I don’t usually go on at this length, but this is important. Good luck.

    #60770
    Dutch
    Spectator

    Hey all; Forced out of riding for only a couple of years. (Ex-wife took my whole collection with her and left me the kids!) It wasn’t so bad… NOT!! I’ve thought about giving it up more times then I care to think about. The closest I’ve ever came was after my S/O and I hit a eight point buck on the way to work one night. The left me laid up for a fair piece. Stop riding? Not very likely!! Ride more carefully, Oh yeah. Vaya con Dios, Dutch

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