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  • #61981
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/ca1a2635.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]The British School of Falconry[/B]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]The British School of Falconry is the nation’s first school of its kind to offer hands-on lessons with trained birds of prey. Guests at the Equinox are invited to try one of the world’s oldest sports in the picturesque setting of Hildene’s meadows and enhance their appreciation of these magnificent birds. During a session, guests will learn to handle and fly Harris hawks. Introductory lessons and “hawk walks” are offered to give guests the opportunity to appreciate these amazing animals.[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    A once in a life-time opportunity. Come early or stay late and learn to hunt with falcons. And there is so much more to do in Manchester, like visiting Hildene and seeing Abraham Lincoln’s top hat.

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/5ed08de6.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Destination:[/B] Manchester, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B] 36 Miles
    [B]Duration:[/B] 45 Minutes

    For more information about the British School of Falconry, [URL=”http://www.equinoxresort.com/thingstodo/falconry/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    [b]The best riding in New England awaits you![/b]

    [B]COME EARLY – STAY LATE [/B]- [B][I]No charge for camping before the rally starts. Vermont wants you to come and have a great time.[/I][/B]
    [LIST]
    [*]Sunday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Monday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Tuesday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Wednesday Camping -[B]FREE[/B]
    [/LIST]
    [B]Rally Registration[/B] is now open. For registration [URL=”http://www.bmwra.org/rally/terms.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    And, hang around for the [B]Yankee Beemer Rally[/B] in Heath Mass. For more information about the [B]YB Rally [/B][URL=”http://www.yankeebeemers.org/Damn_Yankees.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61726
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/894a04bb.jpg[/IMG]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]Central Vermont’s largest municipality, Barre City is the Granite Center of the World. Stone workers from all over Europe created a patchwork of cultures which helped Barre to grow to the diverse municipality it is today.

    Barre City is home for several of Central Vermont’s finest attractions including the Barre Opera House, Hope Cemetery, the Socialist Labor Party Hall, Studio Place Arts, Vermont History Center, Vermont Granite Museum. In addition, there are several annual weekend festivals including the Green Mountain Motorhead Classic Car Spring Fling in early June, Homecoming weekend in July, the Northeast Fiddler’s Association Contest and Festival in September, and Scary Barre: A Harvest Festival in October. And don’t miss the Wednesday Summertime Farmers’ Market and Wednesday Summertime Evening Concert Series. Check out our events calendar for the latest schedule.[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/4e83555a.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Location:[/B] Barre, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B]129 Miles
    [B]Estimated Time:[/B ]2 hrs 48 minutes

    For more information about today’s destination, [URL=”http://www.ci.barre.vt.us/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here![/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL]

    #61727
    cousi
    Spectator

    Come North and ride App Gap (Rt17) from Bristol to Waitsfield.

    [IMG]http://www.i-bmw.com/gallery/data/500/medium/Rt_17_From_the_Top_resized.jpg[/IMG]

    #61729
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/d155475f.jpg[/IMG]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]The trademark of the current Bennington Potters is the solid New England-style pottery shapes that harken back to the very roots of local ceramics production,” says Sheela Harden, the president and CEO of the pottery.

    All the work is done by hand, and the on-site factory makes about 500 pottery dishes and other stoneware dinnerware, bakeware, and serving shapes a day, on a good day. Their “hands-on” approach to the pottery-making process is unique in today’s manufacturing environment.

    The potters who work in the factory have over 20 years of experience at their craft, and pride themselves on producing stoneware which involves a level of hand-craftmanship that few other potteries in the world have an interest in doing any longer. The pottery has clung to making historic designs even though that adds to it’s cost – a problem that other companies have dealt with by simplifying their designs.

    Set of 4 Trigger Stoneware Mugs”All of our pottery shapes have intricate features and complicated kiln firings,” says Harden. “These are features that make our handmade pottery unique. We have continued to produce the largest and deepest stoneware bowls made in the U.S. – no one attempts to do what we do.”

    The potters have remained true to the vision of founder David Gil, who passed away suddenly in early 2002, at age 79. As cookie-cutter dinnerware and bakeware continue to saturate the marketplace, and retailers continue to diversify to the point that they all look like each other, the potters are increasingly seeing that people are looking for something original, something with substance.

    Each piece of Bennington pottery is unique, the quality is superb, no two pieces are exactly alike, which is part of the secret to Bennington’s success. From casual and everyday dinnerware to their more rustic Tavernware line, Bennington offers something for everyone. [/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    [B]Location:[/B] Bennington, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B] 11 Miles
    [B]Estimated Time:[/B] 17 Minutes

    For more information [URL=”http://www.benningtonpotters.com/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61986
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/046e1da2.jpg[/IMG]

    [QUOTE]A Short History of SVAC
    Given that the history of the Southern Vermont Arts Center is peopled by heroes and heroines embarked upon a noble quest, it’s tempting to begin with a familiar “Once upon a time…” But no. Although that noble quest begins humbly, succeeds against great odds and ends happily, the Arts Center’s tale is one of real people, with real vision, who made their own magic from a relatively simple plan.

    That simple plan was hatched in Dorset, Vermont, on a late summer day in 1922. On that day, Edwin B. Child, Francis Dixon, Wallace W. Fahnstock, John Lillie, and Herbert Meyer, five gentlemen who would come to be known as the Dorset Painters, got together to show their wares at the Dorset Town Hall.

    “On that August day,” says historian Mary Hard Bort, in Art and Soul, her definitive history of the Arts Center, “local people came to see the work of their neighbors, visitors stopped by to see what was going on, summer people came to assess the quality of the work, and the ladies of the village served punch, tea and cookies to all. It was a Dorset social event and the start of something much bigger that would encompass the entire Battenkill Valley.”

    Two years later, Francis Dixon and Frank V. Vanderhoof, a summer resident and fellow painter, arranged an exhibition of paintings at Manchester’s Equinox Pavilion by a group that would come to be called the “Southern Vermont Artists.” It was just three years after that, in August of 1927, the ten-day Fourth Annual Exhibition of the Artists of Southern Vermont featured over 100 paintings and drew more than 1,600 visitors from twenty-eight states, Canada, Norway, England, Wales and Algeria.
    [SIZE=”3″]
    [/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/5ed08de6.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Destination:[/B] Manchester, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B] 36 Miles
    [B]Duration:[/B] 45 Minutes

    For more information about the Southern Vermont Arts Center, [URL=”http://www.svac.org/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    [b]The best riding in New England awaits you![/b]

    [B]COME EARLY – STAY LATE [/B]- [B][I]No charge for camping before the rally starts. Vermont wants you to come and have a great time.[/I][/B]
    [LIST]
    [*]Sunday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Monday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Tuesday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Wednesday Camping -[B]FREE[/B]
    [/LIST]

    [B]Rally Registration[/B] is now open. For registration [URL=”http://www.bmwra.org/rally/terms.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    And, stick around for the [B]Yankee Beemer Rally[/B] in Heath Mass. For more information about the [B]YB Rally [/B][URL=”http://www.yankeebeemers.org/Damn_Yankees.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61731
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/33468665.jpg[/IMG]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]In 1977 lifelong friends Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield completed a correspondence course on ice cream making from the Pennsylvania State University. On May 5, 1978, with a $12,000[2] investment the pair opened an ice cream parlor in a renovated gas station in downtown Burlington, Vermont. In 1979, they marked their anniversary by holding the first-ever free cone day, now a nationwide annual celebration.

    The founders were able to combine ice cream making with social activism by creating a three-part mission statement that considered profits as only one measure of success. Their mission statement has three parts: a Social Mission, a Product Mission, and an Economic Mission. Their Social Mission describes the company’s need to operate in a way that recognizes their influence on society, and the importance of improving the quality of life all over the world. Their Product Mission states that they will always strive to make the finest quality products, working to use natural, wholesome ingredients. It also states that they will advertise business mannerisms that respect the Earth. Their Economic mission describes their promise to operate their company on a “sustainable financial basis of profitable growth, increasing value for [their] stakeholders and expanding opportunities for development and career growth for [their] employees.”[3] “Underlying the mission of Ben & Jerry’s is the determination to seek new and creative ways of addressing all three parts, while holding a deep respect for individuals inside and outside the company and for the communities of which they are a part.”[4]

    In 1980, Ben and Jerry rented space in an old spool and bobbin mill on South Champlain Street in Burlington and began packing their ice cream in pints. In 1981, the first Ben & Jerry’s franchise opened on Route 7 in Shelburne, Vermont. In 1983, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream was used to build “the world’s largest ice cream sundae” in St. Albans, Vermont; the sundae weighed 27,102 pounds. In 1984, Häagen-Dazs tried to limit distribution of Ben & Jerry’s in Boston, prompting Ben & Jerry’s to file suit against the parent company, Pillsbury, in its now famous “What’s the Doughboy Afraid Of?” campaign. In 1987, Häagen-Dazs again tried to enforce exclusive distribution, and Ben & Jerry’s filed its second lawsuit against the Pillsbury Company. In 1985, the Ben & Jerry’s Foundation was established at the end of the year with a gift from Ben & Jerry’s to fund community-oriented projects; it was then provided with 7.5% of the company’s annual pre-tax profits. In 1986, Ben & Jerry’s launched its “Cowmobile”, a modified mobile home used to distribute free scoops of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream in a unique, cross-country “marketing drive”—driven and served by Ben and Jerry themselves. The “Cowmobile” burned to the ground outside of Cleveland four months later, but there were no injuries. Ben said it looked like “the world’s largest baked Alaska.” [/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/5c6cb8fa.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Location:[/B] Waterbury, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B] 142 Miles
    [B]Estimated Time:[/B]3 Hours

    For more information about today’s destination, [URL=”http://www.benjerry.com/company/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here!
    [/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL]

    Be sure to visit this website it is one of the most creative on the web! :hurray

    For example; how many ice cream flavors are in the Ben and Jerry’s inventory? For the answer[URL=”http://www.benjerry.com/flavors/our-flavors/#”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5D MOOOOOOV here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61987
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/Famous%20Mugs/Godfather01.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Padrio,[/B]

    There is an issue. A reliable source has told me that Al Ducci’s in Manchester is going to be featured on this web-page as a destination from Pownal.

    What shall we do?

    Leave the gun.
    Take the cannolis.

    (to be continued)

    #61988
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/Famous%20Mugs/Godfather02.jpg[/IMG]
    [B]OK gimoke lets hear it and NOW![/B]

    Da Godfather is going to the RA rally and out of respect will ride a Beemer instead of a Ducati [B]but [/B]Godfather wants
    [LIST]
    [*]Boston North End flavor
    [*]friendly service
    [*]a touch of wise guy service
    [*]roasted peppers
    [*]fresh made mozzarella
    [*]checkered table cloths
    [/LIST]
    [B][I]Capish?[/I][/B]

    (to be continued)

    [b]The best riding in New England awaits you![/b]

    [B]COME EARLY – STAY LATE [/B]- [B][I]No charge for camping before the rally starts. Vermont wants you to come and have a great time.[/I][/B]
    [LIST]
    [*]Sunday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Monday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Tuesday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Wednesday Camping -[B]FREE[/B]
    [/LIST]
    [B]Rally Registration[/B] is now open. For registration [URL=”http://www.bmwra.org/rally/terms.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    And, hang around for the [B]Yankee Beemer Rally[/B] in Heath Mass. For more information about the [B]YB Rally [/B][URL=”http://www.yankeebeemers.org/Damn_Yankees.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61989
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/6c5253b4.jpg[/IMG]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]Author: By Sheryl Julian, Boston Globe
    Date: 10/10/2001

    MANCHESTER, VT – Al Scheps came here 13 years ago from Fair Lawn in North Jersey. He had worked in his Italian father’s mozzarella and ricotta factory there for years, and he arrived in town looking around for a business. He opened a food shop in this southwest corner of Vermont, and called it Al Ducci, a play on Il Duce (“the Duke”).

    Nancy Diaferio, from Corona, in Queens, N. Y. – with an accent to match – was living a few miles away in New York State and wandered into Al Ducci’s looking for a job. She had years of cooking experience and had once owned a food shop in Mount Kisco, N. Y. with her mother and sister.
    He was married and she was married. But not to each other.

    As Diaferio tells the story, one day she “leaned into the cheese case,” and when she straightened up, she noticed Scheps staring at her. He is more discreet: “Nancy came here to work in ’92,” he says. “About a year later, we found each other. Unfortunately, neither of us was single at the time.”
    They are a likely match, not so much in style – “we’re good cop, bad cop,” he says, because she’ll say anything to the customers and he spends a lot of time unruffling feathers – but in work ethic. Scheps, 61, and Diaferio, 41, are perfectionists.

    Sixteen-hour days mean nothing to either one. She roasts peppers individually on the gas burners because she wants that charred taste. He is up at 4 a.m. six days a week to make fresh bread. The rare times that he has a fever or flu and isn’t up to doing it, he comes in anyway. “Then I go back to bed,” he says. Luckily, they practically live over the shop.

    And in that way, Al Ducci is the sort of old-fashioned delicatessen found in urban areas a century ago. Housed in a former food market, it has a tile ceiling and a 100-year-old, creaky, uneven wooden floor. The proprietors themselves are certainly part of the reason the locals frequent Al Ducci. It’s more than an Italian delicatessen with the finest prepared foods in the area. It’s a hangout for the townspeople, the spot where news flows, and the place where natives go to say hello to one another and to the shopkeepers.

    Al Ducci is a few blocks from the shopping activity in town, just far enough away so that you wouldn’t go there unless you knew about it. The delicatessen does a brisk lunch business, serving sandwiches like Diaferio’s popular grilled vegetables made with Scheps’s mozzarella – which he makes on the premises with New York State milk – and bread. Bostonians who own country houses in the area have to call ahead to have cheese and bread set aside for them. By early afternoon on a Friday or Saturday, the cases are emptying quickly.

    Besides plump red peppers, overlapped carefully and drizzled with olive oil, Diaferio makes caponata with minuscule diced eggplant, green and yellow squash, onions, and celery roasted with capers, olives, balsamic vinegar, and tomato paste. It’s an intensely sweet and salty relish. Scheps makes chewy multi-grain bread, focaccia, Italian white bread, ciabetta made with a sourdough starter), and a semolina bread he can’t keep on the shelf. The odd days any loaves are left over, they become semolina crisps, which he then hides for the regulars. He grinds lean pork with fennel, cheese, and parsley for hot and sweet sausages.

    Chicken salad begins with Bell & Evans birds and contains only tomatoes, olives, capers, basil, garlic, olive oil, and parsley. “No vinegar,” Diaferio says, “because it breaks down the food. If you can handle the garlic, it’s dynamite.” When she pulls the meat off the chicken bones, she only uses the big, moist chunks. “You know the meat that you bite into and get cartilage?” she asks. She won’t use it. Instead, she wraps it up and sends it home with the customers who own her favorite dogs. They also offer his mother’s rice pudding, made with risotto rice, whole milk, and heavy cream. Her precision comes with an edge. She describes herself as “a neurotic neat freak. But you have to have one of those in this business.” Diaferio is also tough on her staff. “I like to see the tomatoes diced in a uniform way, because it adds to the look,” she says. “And I don’t like someone to go in and take a scoop of salad. I like them to stir it first.” She has a long list of these particulars.

    The couple works with two helpers, though they’d like more. Trained cooks who are interested in living in Vermont don’t want to work in a delicatessen, she says. “When we run out, we run out.”
    As for the customers, well, they’d better wait their turn and have some respect for the place. She tells a story about watching a teenager head for the cold drinks. “He’s got those big pants, and he’s wearing a seat belt to hold them up,” she says. He opened the door to the refrigerator case and while holding it open, surveyed the array. “Hey, dude!” she yelled out from a spot behind the counter where she sees and hears everything. “You know why they put glass doors on refrigerators?” And without waiting for an answer, she barked: “So you can see in!” The kid inched back and let the door swing shut.

    Scheps says that some customers don’t understand her. The region where she was raised in Queens, he says, “is known as Spaghetti Park.” All the guys who went there were Italians who wore sleeveless undershirts. “You learn how to be tough on those streets.” She says that keeping the cases in the shop filled is such hard work, that if she lets out a shriek, it’s because something went wrong. “There’s so much labor in everything we do. People on the other side of the counter don’t understand that if I burned the frigging eggplant for a dish I was working on, I’m upset.” It’s quick and then it’s over, she says. “I don’t like things festering.”

    Diaferio learned to cook from her grandmother. She had two: Skinny Nanny, who was her Apulian mother’s mother, and Fat Nanny, her Apulian father’s mother. “Skinny Nanny was a terrible cook. Fat Nanny made lentil soup, frittata, and pepper and egg sandwiches to take to school.” The olive oil dripped onto the bread so the sandwich was a mess by the time Diaferio ate lunch. “The kids made fun of me.” Except for the oil-soaked sandwiches, this immigrant cooking is what Dieferio and Scheps offer, with modest concessions to modern tastes. Both claim their stamina comes from their families as well. The only way they’ve distanced themselves from their heritage is by moving so far away from the places where they were raised.

    Once a year, they return to New York, he says, “to ride the subway and go to the museums. And see why we’re in Vermont.[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    Al Ducci is located at:
    133 Elm Street
    Manchester, Vermont
    Phone ~802*362*4449

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/5ed08de6.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Destination:[/B] Manchester, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B] 36 Miles
    [B]Duration:[/B] 45 Minutes

    For more information about the [B]Al Ducci[/B], [URL=”http://www.alduccis.com/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    [b]The best riding in the East awaits you![/b]

    [B]COME EARLY – STAY LATE [/B]- [B][I]No charge for camping before the rally starts. Vermont wants you to come and have a great time.[/I][/B]
    [LIST]
    [*]Sunday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Monday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Tuesday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Wednesday Camping -[B]FREE[/B]
    [/LIST]

    [B]Rally Registration[/B] is now open. For registration [URL=”http://www.bmwra.org/rally/terms.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    And, stick around for the [B]Yankee Beemer Rally[/B] in Heath Mass. For more information about the [B]YB Rally [/B][URL=”http://www.yankeebeemers.org/Damn_Yankees.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61990
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [CENTER][IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/745ac868.gif[/IMG][/CENTER]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]This will be another exciting year for anyone attending the 2010 Event.
    We will have many Featured Shows at this year’s event, The now world renowned Motorcycle Timeline, back by popular demand

    The California Hell Riders Wall of Death, and Saturday June 12th for the first time on the east coast, the Famous MidAmerica Auctions will auction 125 quality antique and special interest motorcycles. Take a moment to look through the site and see some of what you may have missed from past meets or perhaps you have been to this unique event and you may find yourself in our pictures and video links. This Event is brought to you by the Northeast Coalition of Chapters.

    [LIST]
    [*]Hudson Valley
    [*]Yankee
    [*]Big Sandbar
    [*]Seaboard
    [*]Empire & Colonial Chapters of the AMCA
    [/LIST].[/SIZE][/QUOTE]
    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/0b868548.jpg[/IMG]

    If you live on the East Coast don’t miss this show. Pownal, site of the RA rally is 80 miles from Rhinebeck. Come to see the antique motorcycles and then take a scenic ride to Pownal.

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/0f33d963.jpg[/IMG]

    Destination: Rhinebeck, NY
    Distance: 80 Miles
    Duration: 1 Hour 45 Minutes

    For more information about the Antique Motorcycles Association event, [URL=”http://www.rhinebecknationalmeet.com/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here.[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL]

    #61735
    cousi
    Spectator

    Coopertown and [url=http://community.baseballhall.org/Page.aspx?pid=329] [B][I][U][COLOR=”blue”]The Baseball Hall of Fame[/COLOR][/U][/I][/B][/url] are a short ride away from the rally site. Visit it on the way to or from.

    [IMG]http://community.baseballhall.org/view.image?Id=620[/IMG]

    #61736
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [B]Great Suggestion Mike:[/B]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]With over 35,000 three-dimensional artifacts in the Hall of Fame’s collection, each visitor can get a glimpse of what makes baseball special to them. The Museum which details the history of America’s pastime, is split into three floors to highlight baseball’s rich history. It is recommended visitors start on the second floor.[/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/6e70b5e5.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B]113 Miles
    [B]Estimated Time:[/B] 2 Hours and Twenty Minutes

    #61992
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/4427b32e.jpg[/IMG]

    Folks in Vermont are a crafty lot. With six seasons
    [LIST]
    [*]Foliage
    [*]Winter
    [*]Mud
    [*]Spring
    [*]Road Repair
    [*]Summer
    [/LIST]
    it just doesn’t make sense to have a swimming pool in the back yard unless you build it large enough to double as a hockey rink in the Winter season. What to do?

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/eefb045d.gif[/IMG]

    Use the swimming holes that nature has provided in abundance. There are a lot in Vermont and always well used. See the above Map. Want more information about those swimming holes? [URL=”http://www.swimmingholes.org/vt.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5DClick Here.[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL]

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/7221b220.jpg[/IMG]
    [B]For example:[/B]
    [QUOTE]ARLINGTON GREEN [ARLI]: Follow RT 7A north from Bennington, turn left onto RT 313 headed west in Arlington, towards NY state. Approximately five to seven miles down the road will be Covered Bridge Road on the left. Cross the covered bridge and park in the small parking area on the right. Very Confident. Verified Lat/Lon Lat:43.10406 Lon:-73.22041 [/QUOTE]

    Cost of using a swimming hole – [B]FREE[/B]. Cost of building a pool, landscaping it, maintaining it, skimming out dead chipmunks, buying chemicals, putting up a fence and then putting on the pool cover is just overwhelming And then the swimming pool season is about as long as a New York minute.

    The RA is very concerned that you get the true Vermont experience so a river full of swimming possibilities borders that camping area. So …

    [LIST=1]
    [*]Ride the Roads
    [*]Take a dip in the River
    [*]Eat Hardy
    [*]Have a Brewski
    [*]Go back to step one.
    [/LIST]

    [b]The best riding in the East awaits you![/b]

    [B]COME EARLY – STAY LATE [/B]- [B][I]No charge for camping before the rally starts. Vermont wants you to come and have a great time.[/I][/B]
    [LIST]
    [*]Sunday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Monday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Tuesday Camping – [B]FREE[/B]
    [*]Wednesday Camping -[B]FREE[/B]
    [/LIST]

    [B]Rally Registration[/B] is now open. For registration [URL=”http://www.bmwra.org/rally/terms.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    And, stick around for the [B]Yankee Beemer Rally[/B] in Heath Mass. For more information about the [B]YB Rally [/B][URL=”http://www.yankeebeemers.org/Damn_Yankees.html”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL].

    #61737
    PaulBach
    Spectator

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/e38f6355.jpg[/IMG]

    [QUOTE][SIZE=”3″]Located in Vermont’s scenic Lake Champlain valley, Shelburne Museum is one of the nation’s finest, most diverse, and unconventional museums of art and Americana. Over [B]150,000 works[/B] are exhibited in a remarkable setting of [B]39 exhibition buildings[/B], 25 of which are historic and were relocated to the Museum grounds.

    Impressionist paintings, folk art, quilts and textiles, decorative arts, furniture, American paintings, and a dazzling array of 17th-to 20th-century artifacts are on view. Shelburne is home to the finest museum collections of 19th-century American folk art, quilts, 19th- and 20th-century decoys, and carriages. [/SIZE][/QUOTE]

    [IMG]http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g264/PaulBach/RA%20Shots/Maps%20Jpegs/320f46b0.jpg[/IMG]

    [B]Location:[/B] Shelburne, [I][COLOR=”Green”][B]Vermont[/B][/COLOR][/I]
    [B]Distance from Pownal:[/B] 140 Miles
    [B]Estimated Time:[/B] Three Hours

    For more information about today’s destination, [URL=”http://www.shelburnemuseum.org/collections/”%5D%5BB%5D%5BU%5D%5BCOLOR=”Blue”%5Dclick here[/COLOR][/U][/B][/URL]!

    #61741
    vetbmwrider
    Spectator

    [QUOTE=BeemerBJ »]Michael,
    Thank you for the GPS data. Does this place also have an address?
    BJ[/QUOTE]

    The owners of the Green Mountain energy park use a P.O. Box. I have not been to the site, but have been told it is the largest complex on route 7 heading south out of Pownal VT.

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